Running With A Gun

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This is a guest post by Robert Brown

It is no surprise that there are cases in which runners need to carry a firearm, either openly or concealed. It is important to know how to comfortably and safely carry a gun with you on your daily run, in a way that it is easily accessible.

Why Should I Carry While Running?

Here are some common reasons why running with a firearm is necessary:

  • Running in dangerous areas, where there is a risk of getting mugged or attacked
  • When running in urban areas where there is a danger of dog attacks
  • For protection against wild animal attacks when running in the wilderness
  • The gun is part of your line of work

Methods Of Carry

A fanny pack is an easy method of carry whether you’re looking for concealment or comfort when running.

If you’re in a situation where you need to carry more ammo or a larger caliber, a holster will provide a greater level of support.

You could also choose an ankle or thigh holster, but this could be a deal-breaker for those not wishing to wear pants to conceal their firearm.

There is also the option of specialized athletic and other lighter shoulder holsters, which are made of woven fabric and provide proper and comfortable attachment to the body when running.

Lastly, you could also use a belly band, which allows you to carry the gun in several different ways. This elastic band goes around your waist and can hold your gun and magazines. It is recommended that you test the positioning of the belly band by practicing your draw of an empty gun before going out running with it.

Factors To Consider

There is a wide variety of holsters and alternatives for safe and comfortable gun storage during running or any other athletic activity. Here are some factors to consider when choosing what equipment you want to support the firearm:

  • It needs to be easily accessible so that you can quickly draw it and use it at any point
  • It has to be concealed (or at least in most cases, this is advisable)
  • It must be safely held, so that it doesn’t accidentally go off, fall out or cause chaffing or other injuries to your skin and body while running

Tips And Tricks

If you are an endurance runner, you may want to carry fewer bullets in order to make your weapon lighter. Be sure to wear comfortable running shoes to avoid accidental stumbling and tripping.

If you’re in a situation where you need more ammo or a larger caliber, make sure the gun is supported with a sturdy holster. An ideal setup would be a leather, Kydex or hybrid holster with either a button detent or supporting strap. Combined with a thicker belt similar to those worn by gun instructors, it will ensure the weapon stays close to your body and will not come loose. Also, stay away from holsters which require the gun to be in Condition 3 (Magazine in, hammer forward and no round in the chamber).

Make sure you wipe and dry your firearm after your workout or run. Moisture is metal’s natural enemy, because it can lead to rust, which will damage your gun. Depending on your method of carry, you can place a cloth against it to keep the sweat off of the gun during your training session.

To ensure that your skin is safe from chaffing, wear compression shorts, boxer shorts, tights or socks under a holster.

Running Comfortably And Safely

There are many ways to carry, but only one will be most comfortable for you. Make sure the weapon is safely secured and won’t fall out or bounce around too much from activities. Ideally, make sure the trigger guard is protected. Lastly, try the carry method with the gun empty in a couple short practice sessions, making any corrections before taking it out for a full run or activity. Most importantly of all, be aware of your surroundings and have fun!

About The Author

Robert Brown – A runner, sports writer and founder of Runabees.com

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The author

Tyler Capobres has years of experience torture testing guns, knives and gear to their limit. If he's not writing about gun projects, reviewing products or arguing with anti-gun zealots on Twitter, you'll find him at the range. Owner of thegoodgun.com, a website dedicated to all gun and knife enthusiasts.

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